Bareroot sales are done for spring but potted plants are still available at the nursery!

Sweetheart Sweet Cherry
Sweetheart Sweet Cherry

Sweetheart Sweet Cherry

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$50.00
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History: Sweetheart was developed at the Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Summerland, BC as a cross between Van and Newstar. The cross was made in 1975, the variety selected for further testing in 1982, and then finally released in 1994. It is the parent of several other sweet cherry varieties and was awarded the Outstanding Cultivar Award by the American Society for Horticultural Science in the 2010s.

Why We Grow It: These cherries boast the longest harvest period of any sweet cherry, and stores well too. The bright red, heart-shaped fruit are sweet and crack-resistant. 

Canadian Hardiness Zone: 5

Soil Preference: Sandy loam, loam, clay loam. Prefers average to moist conditions with well-drained soils, avoid planting anywhere that floods for more than two weeks in the spring. 

Growth Habits and Disease Resistance: Spreading growth habit, precocious, produces very heavy and reliable crops. Very susceptible to mildew.

Sun/Shade: Full sun (approx. 8-10 hours of sun daily)

Pollination: Self-pollinating, this variety will produce fruit without a cherry tree of a different variety but will produce more and better fruit if one is present. Sweet and Sour cherries cannot be relied upon to pollinate each other. Sweetheart is an excellent pollinator for other sweet cherries that bloom around the same time.  

Flowering Time: Early

Bloom Colour: White

Ripens: Late July

Storage: Sweet cherries normally keep 1-2 weeks in the fridge but Sweetheart stores exceptionally well

Recommended Use: Fresh eating, canning, drying

Size including roots:

  • 50-80 cm, 1 year whip
  • 100cm +, 1 year whip/branched (same pricing for trees branched or not over 100cm)
Quantity must be 1 or more

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